• intuitive designKeep it simple.
  • The small details are extremely important.
  • Using distinct contrast – in color, or value (light/dark) – is the best way to call attention to what’s most important.
  • Understand that one size does not fit all. What seems intuitive to one might not seem intuitive to another, for various reasons.
  • Understand that, no matter what you do, people will still make mistakes or use it in inappropriate ways.
  • Beware of the special knowledge set you’ve acquired because you are a designer. Most users won’t have that knowledge set. Be careful not to assume that they do. Don’t design it for yourself. Think like someone who’s never seen the product before.
  • Use elemental affordances (basic forms that we learn to use at an early age, e.g., “a knob is for turning”; “a button is for pushing”).
  • Stress will always have an impact on cognitive function. Products used in stressful situations must be that much more simple/intuitive.
  • Adhere to users’ expectations (use elemental affordances).
  • Evaluate how your design might be perceived by a younger or older generation. Will they be familiar with the design cues you’ve provided that tell them how to use it?
  • The design itself isn’t intuitive. It’s whether the person using it feels it’s intuitive.